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The biodiversity emergency

Nature restores, but is itself in need of restoration. Due to our constant commodification of the natural world we are erasing huge chunks of its awe-inspiring variety and damaging ourselves in the process. This edition's big story amplifies some of the concerns of those who live closest to nature, while attempting to get to grips with the complex challenges involved if we want to stop biodiversity's catastrophic decline. In the words of author Lucy Jones, we can no longer view nature as 'a luxury, an extra, a garnish.'

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Credit: Neil Palmer (CIAT). Women farmers at work in their vegetable plots near Kullu town, Himachal Pradesh, India. 

Adding pain to the pandemic

Nilanjana Bhowmick on the recent legislation steamrolled through parliament that has disadvantaged working people and gripped...

With Trump’s defeat, Bolsonaro loses his imaginary friend

Bolsonaro’s desperate pledges to Trumpism have not paid off, argues Leonardo Sakamoto. 
An ingenious agroforestry farming system, which combines trees, shrubs and crops is practiced throughout Ethiopia’s lush southern highlands. OLIVIER BOURGUET/ALAMY

How ancient forest gardens keep hunger at bay

Tesfa-Alem Tekle showcases the unique agroforestry system that sustains communities in Ethiopia’s southern highlands.
When thousands of genetically identical birds are stacked together – like these chickens on a farm in France – there are no immunological firebreaks to stop the spread of disease. GETTY IMAGES

Planet farm

Rob Wallace connects industrialized farming to the emergence of ever more deadly pathogens.

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