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Back to work: garment workers in Dhaka, Bangladesh, after factories re-opened in May. Mohammad Ponir Hossain/Reuters

The trouble with normal is it always gets worse

A clamour to return to the status quo after Covid-19 would be bad news for people and the planet, argues Richard Swift. We may never get a better chance for a new normal.

Prime Minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu, pictured on a diplomatic trip to Brazil in 2019. Credit: Alan Santos/PR  Flickr/Palácio do Planalto

Israel can’t be allowed to continue its colonization of Palestinian lands, writes Ben Jamal of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

Former World Bank president Jim Yong Kim sold $320 million in pandemic bonds during the Ebola crisis.   The bonds, however, did not pay out, even though over 2,000 people have died. Credit: WikiCommons

Liam Taylor on the World Bank’s waning reputation in pandemic response.

Leasing a flying ICU to go between Belém and Brasília costs over $6,794 – or 63 months’ wages of a person within the poor 50 per cent.

In Brazil, the rich, who infected the poor, are now buying ICU flights for themselves.

Husna Rizvi makes a vital suggestion.

Women in Qamishlo, the de-facto capital of Rojava, protest against a Turkish-Russian deal that threatens them and the gains of their revolution. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty

Turkey is bent on extinguishing a beacon of women’s liberation in northern Syria. But the women of Rojava are not giving up, writes Dilar Dirik.

Get out! Young Kurds confront a Turkish military vehicle on patrol in northern Syria after Turkey's invasion. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty

Under the cover of Covid-19, Turkey is hammering the Kurds. Again. Should the world care? Vanessa Baird offers several good reasons why it should.

Past issues

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